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James Edward Flanders
Dallas' First Architect
CHAPTER EIGHT - PAGE 4 of 4
THE CHURCHES OF FLANDERS
The First Presbyterian Church of Denison  Although no historical information about this church has yet been found, it is included here because of its' importance in illustrating Flanders' evolving church design.  He listed this church in his commissions in a Dallas City Directory ad.  Because of that and because of its' style we can feel confident that it is his, This church has the first "Flandersian" tower but does not yet have the triad of towers and the second tower here still reverts to a different design.
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THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF DENISON - This illustration is from a postcard,  No. A3790 published by the Union News Company, St. Louis, Mo. Lelpzig - Berlin
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH - 1900ca
Denison, Texas
NOTE - Churches on this page have been added since the site was originally published and these entries are no longer in chronological order. 
WAPLES METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH SOUTH - This illustration is from  the churches website
WAPLES METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH SOUTH
- 1899  Denison, Texas
This building was constructed in 1899 at 830 West Main Street in Denison. It is described on the churches website which says:

"The building was completed in 1899 and was heralded as the finest church in North Texas with its tall spires and stained glass. The purity and richness of the stained glass was due to the talents of European glass cutters who designed the windows for the church. The light fixtures were made of heavy brass hoops with seven individual shades attached, and all of the altar furniture was hand carved by local craftsmen."

The building was in use until 1965.  This is yet another early Flanders church but is one more step towards his later designs.  Compare it to the Denison Presbyterian church above.
The church was built in 1897 on the corner of Benge and Hunt Streets in McKinney, Texas. A contemporary description of the church edifice exists in an account of the church dedication in the McKinney Gazette, December 16, 1897. It's informative in the construction details it contains including features of the Akron plan:

"The finished building is indeed a handsome structure, a combination of the gothic and Romanesque styles of architecture.  A heavy frame, it is veneered with Texas stone to the water tables, above that being red pressed brick with light yellow brick and stone trimmings.  The roof is of metal and is surmounted by a handsome Greek cross, while the tower covered with Eastlake shingles attains a height of 90 feet and bears aloft a burnished crown  The windows, of cathedral glass,  are beautiful.  From the main auditorium which is fifty-six feet square the Sunday school room 32x56 feet, is separated by panels of solid oak suspended by weights and pulleys, which when raised constitute one large auditorium 56x88 feet, from any portion of which the speaker may be seen and heard, exceedingly handsome thirty light chandelier being suspended in the auditorium" "

Elder Homer T. Wilson who delivered the dedication misspoke when he referred to the architect as Mr. Flannery, while saying:

"In beauty of architecture, convenience of arrangement and elegance of finish, this is one of the most magnificent structures in which I have ever been permitted to address a congregation."

It's one of the last Flanders churches to feel the influence of the Victorian period..
CHRISTIAN CHURCH - 1897
McKinney, Texas
CHRISTIAN CHURCH in McKINNEY, TEXAS
This illustration is from  a postcard published
exclusively  for Duke & Ayres Nickel Stores
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH - 1899
McKinney, Texas
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH in McKINNEY, TEXAS
This illustration is from a postcard.  There is no printer/publication  information on the card .
This design shares some elements of the 1882 First Presbyterian Church of Dallas designed by Flanders. The building was constructed in 1897 at the corner of Kentucky and Lamar streets in McKinney.

The previous building was sold and razed and the congregation met in the court house until the new building, on the same site was completed.
AN INTERIOR PHOTOGRAPH
shows the Akron Plan quarter-circle arrangement of the pews.
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH SOUTH - 1907
San Angelo, Texas
METHODIST CHURCH  in SAN ANGELO, TEXAS
This illustration is from the San Angelo United Methodist Church directory and is used by permission.
Information on this edifice has proven illusive. One source says it was built in stating "1904-Akron Sanctuary built with Pilcher organ."  It appears more likely that the cornerstone was laid in 1906 and the building completed the following year.  One source says it was used until 1928 and another says it burned in 1945 and the congregation  met in the city auditorium until a new sanctuary could be built,  If the latter date is correct it was influenced by the earlier Trinity Methodist Church particularly in the two covered entries at the base of the front towers.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH in COMANCHE, TEXAS
This illustration is from a postcard.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH - 1907
Comanche, Texas
This church was built at 207 North Pearl Street in Comanche in 1907.  It combines some of the elements of the 1905 Baptist church in Pittsburg and the Presbyterian church of Corsicana with the cleaner Prairie School designs on many of JEFs' other churches from the time period.

The congregation faded away and this wonderful little church was razed just last year, 2012. 
ASSOCIATED REFORM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH - 1900ca
Corsicana, Texas
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH in CORSICANA,  TEXAS
This illustration is from a postcard.
Flanders listed this church as a reference in an ad when he was partnering with the architect Sevrin Skielvig, about 1900.  This was the same partnership that created the design for the Terrell Methodist Church. This building was located on the corner of Fourth Avenue and Fifteenth Street.
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH SOUTH - 1907
Arlington, Texas
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH SOUTH - ARLINGTON,  TEXAS
This illustration is from a postcard.
The photograph in the picture looks as though it were taken as construction on the building was being completed. There is neither landscaping nor walkways and there appears to be scaffolding in place in the back.

The June 27th edition of the Arlington Journal says:

"The old wooden building of the Methodist Church has been supplanted by the new brick building on the northeast corner of Division and Center Streets.  The Reverend Edward R. Wallace was the pastor."

The large covered entry with the steps on one side can also be seen in the Waxahachie Methodist Church.
EAST DALLAS CHRISTIAN CHURCH - 1912
Dallas, Texas
EAST DALLAS CHRISTIAN SOUTH - DALLAS,  TEXAS
This illustration is from  a postcard published by the
Acmegraph Co., Chicago, IL
The East Dallas Christian Church located at Peak and Junius Streets was one of the last Dallas structures designed by Flanders who moved to San Diego, California the following year.  The congregation began planning for the new building as early as 1908 when the Rev. Cephas Shelburne came from Virginia to take over the pastorate of the church.  He oversaw the construction of the building and the congregation held their first service in it on May 5, 1912. A new sanctuary went into use only thirteen years later in 1925 but it appears that it was added to the Flanders structure and  the old building, with another use, remains today as seen in the photograph below right.
A REVIVAL MEETING AT THE
EAST DALLAS CHRISTIAN SOUTH - DALLAS,  TEXAS

This photograph is from the churches' website..
POLK STREET METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH SOUTH - 1907
Amarillo, Texas
This church in the traditional Flandesian style was built at the same time as the Potter County courthouse - both in Amarillo. It was located on the corner of Polk and Eighth Streets and the year after its' construction was renamed Polk Street Methodist Church.  The edifice served the congregation until 1926 when growth forced the building of a new sanctuary.
THE POSTCARD PHOTOGRAPH INCORRECTLY IDENTIFIES THE BUILDING AS THE FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Postcard illustration publisher unknown
WAXAHACHIE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH SOUTH - 1905
Waxahachie, Texas
This edifice compares to the Farmersville, Chickasha, and Vernon designs. In spite of it being the most disordered Flanders church design, this one still has some redeeming elements.  It's one of the very few churches that puts the entry on the longer axis.  From the sidewalk, there are two separate walkways to two separate covered entries and the one on the right is large enough to actually gather in and visit before or after services.   Windows in this design play a lesser role than in many other JEF churches. The building was used from 1905 until 1950 when the congregation then required a larger place of worship.
WAXAHACHIE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH SOUTH
Postcard illustration no publisher information